When the Raspberry Pi foundation announced the release of the new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, I ordered two from element 14 (element14.com). They were the only vendors at the time who had them in stock for the standard price of $35. When I received them I discovered that when they say the 3B+ needs 5V/2.5A, they really mean 2.5A, not 2.4A like I’d been using before. So I went back online and order a pair of new power supplies, along with two Samsung PRO Plus microSDHC 32GB cards. I also discovered via the dreaded red flashing power LED (four flashes) that the older Samsung EVO+ 32GB microSDHC cards would not boot the 3B+ fully. I don’t know why as they work just fine on every other earlier Raspberry Pi I own, up to and including the prior 3 Model B. Interestingly I didn’t have boot issues with any of the SanDisks I was using, just that particular card brand and model.

I also ran into an issue updating all my Arch Linux ARM Raspberry Pi systems. They all failed to update (pacman -Suy), and they all failed when attempting to get the catalog from the community repository. A bit of checking on the official Arch wikis turned up nothing. This isn’t the first time I’ve faced this update failure and been forced to reinstall Arch as a consequence. This time, rather than reinstall Arch, I decided to switch completely to the “official” Raspberry Pi distribution, Raspbian.

Raspbian has undergone considerable polish over the last 12 months, to the point where I can easily live within the Raspbian graphical desktop. The desktop has a very nice file browser, terminal, and the Chromium browser is now up-to-date with equivalents across all operating systems. I installed Raspbian by pulling down the image file and using Etcher, all of this on my Ubuntu 16.04 notebook. It’s extremely easy to load-and-go with both Raspbian and Etcher. Before I wiped and reloaded, I made full backups of the older /home/alarm home directories to pick up all my earlier work, then copied them back to the pi account home directory via a separate folder.

With Raspbian everything seems to be working just fine. I was even able to start this post on the older Raspberry Pi 3 Model B using Chromium, although I finished the post on my Mac. I had to transfer a photo I took using my iPhone via Google Drive, and I could have done it on the Pi, but I’m a Mac addict, and I wanted to run something undisturbed on the Pi.

One test I ran was using the tools I wrote in Python for the Sense HAT. I won’t go into the details of how I got the Arch Linux ARM set up to work, but I will say that Raspbian was already set up out-of-the-box to run my Python code unmodified with the Sense HAT plugged into the board, and without installing and/or configuring any other Raspbian packages. I look forward to moving my C++ based Pi code over.

One other observation: The 3B+ runs warm, much warmer than any other Raspberry Pi. I’ve done nothing to tweak the operating frequency of the board. My advice is to buy the heat sink kit for the Raspberry Pi and attach it to the board.

bo man

February 4, 2018

I’m not watching the Super Bowl tonight. I haven’t in decades. I can’t stand brutalized and barbaric American football.

Instead, I’m playing around with my camera and Lightroom and Nik Analog Efex Pro, working to make my ginger Bo Man look his best. My Nik Collection was purchased back before Google bought them and then later sold them on after pulling Snapseed, the iOS/Android photo post-processing app. Google never had any intention to continue the full Nik Collection development. So everything except Snapseed languished, until Google sold the Collection to DxO. It will be interesting to see if, let alone how, DxO grandfathers all us prior owners into their version of the Collection.

But for now my versions of the Nik Collection continues to work on my MBP, even with macOS 10.13.3. I’m satisfied, and so is Bo Man.